If you own more than one wheelchair, it may be better not to take your “primary” wheelchair, which may be a more expensive piece of equipment.  
 It is also a good idea for your wheelchair to look clean when you fly since a clean wheelchair is likely to be treated with more respect by airport personnel during transfers.  

For all types of wheelchairs, you may also attach to your wheelchair a note asking handlers to “be careful when handling the wheelchair”.  If the native language of the country of destination is not English, you could provide translated instructions, since this will personalize your wheelchair and encourage wheelchair handlers to be more careful.  
 
For owners of battery-operated wheelchairs, before you fly be sure you know the type of batteries that your wheelchair uses. Wet-cell batteries need to be disconnected to protect the terminals against electrical shorting because they are considered spillable. On the other hand, dry-cell and gel-cell batteries are considered non-spillable, have fewer requirements for handling and don’t need to be disconnected.  
 
During Check-In or before boarding the aircraft, you may perform a last check on your wheelchair. At this point, with an aim of protecting vital removable wheelchair parts from damage or loss, and while taking into consideration the respective airline’s restrictions on the weight and size of carryon luggage, it is a good idea to take off from the wheelchair and take into the aircraft cabin with you all removable parts such as footrests, armrests, headrest, seat cushion and the electronic control.   

« Back